.

Parking Tickets Swept Under the Rug? Council Weighs In

After receiving complaints about how the city handles parking tickets on street sweeping days, the City Council will be evaluating the city's process at today's meeting and deciding if it is fair enough or in need of change.

The City Council will be looking into possibly changing how the city handles parking tickets on street sweeping days after a number of residents complained that the neighborhoods east of El Camino Real were being unfairly targeted.

Resident Sara Glascock brought the issue to the council at a recent meeting and told the city how she was while her more affluent neighbors on the other side of El Camino Real seemingly got ignored by parking enforcement officers.

The council will now be discussing the issue at at 7 p.m.

But if any changes are made, it won't be as simple as placing more "no parking" signs throughout the entire city.

Parking tickets for street sweeping go all the way back to 1982, when the council decided to fine residents for parking on streets on street sweeping days to prevent flooding. Many of the streets east of El Camino Real were prone to flooding, the city found.

Many of the streets in that area are still narrow and homes have one-car garages, so many people continue to park on the street.

Despite residents' complaints that the city was unfairly targeting certain residents when it came to parking enforcement on street sweeping days, the city says it didn't extend those rules west of El Camino Real because those streets typically were never susceptible to flooding, and they were generally wider and less congested.

The city now says parking restrictions should be extended across El Camino Real, at least to some neighborhoods.

According to a staff report, the Mills Park and Lomita Park neighborhoods would benefit from having parking restrictions on street sweeping days because narrow streets and a limited number of trees contribute to clogged storm drains.

These changes would come with a cost.

If additional parking restrictions were put in place, the Police Department is asking for two more parking enforcement officers and one more vehicle, which would cost the city $1 million. The parking fines would offset some of the costs, the police department said.

For more news about San Bruno, follow San Bruno Patch on Twitter
and "like" us on Facebook. Got Patch in your inbox? Sign up for our newsletter.

Martin Ricard July 11, 2012 at 12:53 AM
Heidi, the city didn't say how much it makes on the tickets, only that the annual cost to enforce the parking restrictions is currently $10,000.
Martin Ricard July 11, 2012 at 12:55 AM
Here's a breakdown of the $1 million cost: -Annual salary/benefits for extra parking enforcement officers: $172,000 -additional parking enforcement vehicle: $32,000 -additional signs on city streets: $800,000
Sara Glascock July 11, 2012 at 05:21 AM
Even the council chuckled a bit over the $800,000 street signs.
joe July 14, 2012 at 01:18 AM
Great work Sara, can't believe they said it would cost $1 million. I think Chris has a FANTASTIC idea that should be implemented immediately!!
EFEEZY MARTIN October 12, 2012 at 01:10 AM
Look at Broadmoor police, DOES IT MAKE SENSE THAT THEIR PD GETS A FLEET OF BRAND NEW CHARGERS? I GUESS THE BROADMOOR REGION OF DALY CITY MAKES A TON OF MONEY WHEN COMPARED TO THE CITY OF SAN BRUNO, WHO SAYS IT COSTS $1MILLION FOR TWO NEW PARKING TICKET OFFICERS AND 1 NEW SCOOTER/VEHICLE, SOUNDS LIKE BS- EM

Boards

More »
Got a question? Something on your mind? Talk to your community, directly.
Note Article
Just a short thought to get the word out quickly about anything in your neighborhood.
Share something with your neighbors.What's on your mind?What's on your mind?Make an announcement, speak your mind, or sell somethingPost something
See more »